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What is "Poverty" Today in Canada?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by BetteTheRed, May 12, 2018.

  1. BetteTheRed

    BetteTheRed Resident Heretic

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    Among our midst, we have:

    - people who are disabled and working
    - people who are living on a fixed income, like a pension
    - people who work at jobs that provide a wide variety of remuneration

    What makes one "poor"?

    Obviously depends a great deal on prices of various commodities. Rent is pretty cheap in the Yukon/NWT. Groceries are outrageous. Similarly, Newfoundland. Major urban centres - notably Vancouver. Victoria, Toronto - have huge housing price problems that trickle down to rental prices. But there's almost always a No Frills nearby.
     
  2. crazyheart

    crazyheart tomorrow,tomorrow

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    you are poor if the income you make does not feed your family until the next pay day.
     
  3. BetteTheRed

    BetteTheRed Resident Heretic

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    But what is your income supporting besides food? Is internet "necessary"? What about a land-line? What about a cell phone? What makes one poor?
     
  4. Kimmio

    Kimmio This is my custom title

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    Internet and some kind of phone - to be able to communicate with the outside world, is a necessity for most today.

    I don’t pay for internet and i’m on a family/ group cell plan for years now. My father was concerned because I didn’t have a cell phone - or I did but it was pay as you go and sometimes I wouldn’t get my minutes refilled right away - way over in the big city - and I was coming home alone at night, so he added me as a Christmas gift. My 1/2 brother is also on it.
     
  5. Kimmio

    Kimmio This is my custom title

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    Poverty is when average rent for a 1 bedroom leaves one hardly any money for food and other necessities. I would say being isolated from social activities your peers are doing, and discussing, because you can’t afford to be included, is a form of poverty. Social isolation for reasons beyond your immediate control, that’s poverty, too.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
  6. BetteTheRed

    BetteTheRed Resident Heretic

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    Which means that many seniors, on fixed incomes, are in poverty. We discussed this, while planning for an all-candidates meeting the other day. Seniors are definitely an "at risk" group given their fixed incomes. It's fine when you first retire, but as your pension loses value, and prices increase, it becomes problematic. The "working poor" are less at risk if the minimum wage increases. Pensions don't do that, much. It's sorta set up to "quit working then die" as a plan.
     
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  7. Graeme Decarie

    Graeme Decarie Well-Known Member

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    I think poverty is wider than that. Access to education should be open to everyone. It isn't - not beyond high school. it's only for those of much higher than average income. There's also such a thing as intellectual poverty in which children grow up surrounded by low expectation - and therefore achieve less than they could.

    Poverty also has to be defined in terms of what is available. In a society of billionaires, a millionaire is poor. We live in a society of a monstrous and growing gap between the very wealthy and the rest of us.
     
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  8. Kimmio

    Kimmio This is my custom title

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    Except job stability is almost non-existent. There’s a lot of precarious employment, ie non salaried, hourly contract jobs and p/t shift work with no benefits. So the working poor are still at risk. Anytime you do not know from month to month what money will be coming in to plan with, you’re at risk. Also rent prices and contracts are not fixed, but fluctuating...and again without monthly salaries, hourly precarious employment that puts many working people at risk.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
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  9. Kimmio

    Kimmio This is my custom title

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    Another thread had me thinking back to an old memory. I found this video. These people may have had no money but they were rich in so many ways... yes, they squatted there illegally for years. At the same time, they weren’t bothering anybody and they respected the environment. It’s legal to pitch a tent - it’s a very popular backpacking/ hiking and surfing spot - but not build a cabin out of tarps and scrap wood, I guess.

     
  10. Kimmio

    Kimmio This is my custom title

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    That girl in the video, Leah Oke, is now a world champion pro surfer, on Olympic Team Canada, 2020. She is not poor. She’s living a rich life (and not regarding money). I was just reading about the Sombrio squatters - they were like a family, and there were several sad times - including losing her brother who was a promising pro surfer, and her dad, a veteran surfer. Some of them lived there for 25 years before the government tore and burned their homes down.

    Canadian surfers prepare to ride Tofino waves for a ticket to worlds
     
  11. Luce NDs

    Luce NDs Well-Known Member

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    X - communication is a lonely state ... thus attention paid to rites and writ of the passed ...
     
  12. Luce NDs

    Luce NDs Well-Known Member

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    An unconscious scheme ... once called a conspiracy of numbing value ... once you look back at it from that spot outside ... tis a spot poorly understood by the filthy rich ... phi-L-thy what? Some alien thought required to fill the voids ... that's what love passes on ... the nothing domain ... stunning!
     
  13. Luce NDs

    Luce NDs Well-Known Member

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    Is X-communicato like denial of thought and lack of compassion? Tis popular in some high states ...
     
  14. Seeler

    Seeler Well-Known Member

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    Most of the people who we do outreach for at our church are poor, many are near homeeless or actually homeless. They mostly consider a cell phone aa necessity. Social services seeems to agree.
     
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  15. Seeler

    Seeler Well-Known Member

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    Being poor in Canada means -
    - spending more than half your income on shelter that is sub-standard and/or overcrowded and/or never owning your own home
    - keeping track of prices as you pick up necessities at the grocery store because you only have $xxx in your pocket and you need enough to feed your family for a week or more and its so embarassing to run over at the check-out and have to put some back because you don't have any money in the bank either.
    - rationing - one piece of fruit a day (if you're lucky) one glass of milk - and don't touch your father's lunch meat - and left-overs are not for seconds but will make tomorrow's dinner.
    - saying 'no' to your kids - no you can't go (camping, to the fair, on a weekend trip); no we can't go to church family camp again this year; no you can't try out for hockey; no you can't have music lessons.
    - buying clothes at rummage sales and Value Village, not because you are thrifty or like to get a bargain but because it's the only way to buy them; aand always wearing clothes that don't quite go together or fit well or are in style.
    - never being able to pput togetheer an entire outfit (you find a pretty dress for your daughters' school concert and she's embarassed because she has to wear her old sneakers)
    - not having school supplies except the very basics provided by the school which aare never enough
    - walking, or staying home, because you don't have bus fare (a taxi is a luxury)
    - always bumming rides, never being able to repay a friend's kindness
    - cutting medicine in two because you can't afford the full dosage your doctor ordered
    - not going to the dentist or eye doctor because they aren't covered by medicare
    - limited choices
    - no putting some aside for emergencies or saving, no pension fund, no making plans for the future

    Of course these don't all apply to everybody all the time. Seasonal workers might get ten months with a mild winter one year and only seven months when weather shuts down operations or no contracts come in. Social Services might provide dental care - but not for the working poor. Some schools have free lunch programs. Some churches are more sensitive than others at making sure everybody is included. Some people live in areas where libraries, parks, play grounds, outdoor concerts are available. Some people are healthy, hard-working and imaginative and can provide good meals, creative opportunities, and entertainment for their families at very little cost. And some people have better-off relatives who can provide hand-me-downs, a second-hand sewing machine, an invite to a barbeque or the family cottage.

    But generally being poor is no fun. The longer a person is poor the harder to get out of it. Generational poverty is a real challange.



    -
     
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  16. Luce NDs

    Luce NDs Well-Known Member

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    Generational poverty is a real challenge.


    Corrupt authority admires it as a means of denial and exclusion of the disliked which may come back at them as Daedalus ... an airy expression of alter ego?

    Should one cross this device separating the powers from lesser domains? It could simply be literature ... with hidden intense statements ...
     
  17. Pinga

    Pinga Room for All

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    GeoFee, crazyheart and Kimmio like this.
  18. monk

    monk Holistic Anarchist

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    Third World conditions?

    It’s not unusual for politicians to dub conditions on Canada’s reserves “Third World.”

    The label, however, is typically saved for places such as Attawapiskat or Pikangikum — isolated northern First Nations where living conditions are so deteriorated they routinely attract the national media lens.

    Six Nations is different.

    It’s the country’s most populated reserve, and among the most developed. It’s wealthy — at least as far as First Nations go — and less than an hour from several of Canada’s largest urban hubs.

    It’s a place Crowder and others should have no reason to describe as “Third World.”

    But they do.

    “For people to live in Third World conditions right next to a major metropolitan centre — there’s something wrong with that,” says Crowder, the NDP aboriginal affairs critic. “It’s shocking.”

    STANDING STILL: Running water remains a dream for most on Six Nations
    Despite years of promises and studies, thousands of homes on reserve lack direct access to clean drinking water.
     
  19. Graeme Decarie

    Graeme Decarie Well-Known Member

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    Seeler makes a very strong point with his comment on generational poverty. I grew up among families like that. Those were the kids I went to school with. And the proportion of those who stayed there was very high.
     
  20. Luce NDs

    Luce NDs Well-Known Member

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    The odds supported by worried powers suggest that it is best that the wee people remain poor and stunned ...
     

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